0161 764 4618
Armac Vets, 147 The Rock, Bury, BL9 0ND
info@armacvets.co.uk
Open 24 hrs a day, 365 day a year.

Armac Veterinary Care | 24 Hr Vet Practices Bury, Bolton & Fairfield

  • 0161 764 4618

    info@armacvets.co.uk

  • Armac Vets, 147 The Rock, Bury,

    BL9 0ND

  • Open 24 hrs a day,

    365 day a year.

FIREWORKS AND YOUR PETS – TAKE THE FRIGHT OUT OF NOISY NIGHTS

Armac Veterinary CareBlogFIREWORKS AND YOUR PETS – TAKE THE FRIGHT OUT OF NOISY NIGHTS

FIREWORKS AND YOUR PETS – TAKE THE FRIGHT OUT OF NOISY NIGHTS

9 October 2017 Posted by natalie Blog , , , ,

Many pets become anxious and frightened when fireworks are going off and some become extremely distressed. Unlike us, they don’t understand why there are loud bangs and flashes outside. If you own a puppy or kitten, there are steps you can take to reduce the chance of your pets growing up scared of fireworks. If you own an adult pet that’s already scared of fireworks, there are ways to help them cope.

HOW DO I STOP THEM GROWING UP SCARED?

Get them used to the sounds of everyday life during their first couple of months. Gradually let them hear the washing machine, vacuum cleaner, television and other household noises. Getting used to sounds during this early ‘socalisation period’ means they are far less likely to be scared of noises and fireowrks as adults.Playing a socialisation CD is also a good way of getting them used to sounds including firework noises. By doing this, your petis more likely to be calm and unafraid when they hear the real fireworks. You can but these CD’s from us at reception.

HOW DO I PREPARE MY DOG FOR FIREWORK SEASON?

Create a den for your dog to hide in when they hear fireworks, it helps them to cope with their fear. This could be inside a wardrobe or cupboard, or behind a sofa. Pad it with old pillows and blankets to soundproof it and, in the weeks leading up to fireworks season, give your dog access to the den at all times.

Give healthy treats and praise when your dog uses it’s den, to build a positive associaton. Don’t force your dog to go into the den you’ve made if they prefer a different hiding place.

Use a pheromone plug-in nearby. Pheromones are scents that calm dogs, but we can’t smell them. They’are available from reception.

Microchip your pet, just incase the worst happens and they escape from home. That way, there’s more chance you will be reunited. By law all dogs sgould be microchipped.

SIGNS OF STRESS IN PETS

DOGS

  • Trembling and shaking
  • Clinging to owners
  • Excessive barking
  • Cowering and hiding behind furniture
  • Trying to run away
  • Soiling in the house
  • Pacing and panting
  • Refusing to eat

CATS

  • Cowering and hiding behind or on top of furniture
  • Trying to run away
  • Soiling in the house
  • Refusing to eat

RABBITS

  • Stamping hind feet
  • Staying motionless
  • Trying to escape

WHAT SHOULD I DO ON FIREWORK NIGHT?

  • Take your dog for a walk well before fireworks are due to begin (before it goes dark)
  • keep doors, windows and cat/dog flaps closed
  • Draw the curtains
  • Play music with a repetitive beat to help mask the sounds
  • Don’t comfort or reasuure your pets, (even though it is tempting) as it will inadvertently reward their fear. Instead, act normally so they can see there is nothing to worry about.
  • Never punish your pet – it’s not their fault they are scared and it adds to their anxiety
  • Let cats hide where they like, don’t try to tempt them out
  • Don’t pick up or restrain them if they’re scared: cats prefer to control how they cope

HOW TO HELP YOUR PET LONG TERM

Pets that are scared of fireworks and other loud noises can be treated for their fear using effective behavoiural techniques. It takes time and patience, but can achieve excellent results.

  • Tell the ve tabout your pet’s fear of loud noises. They check there isn’t a medical reason, e.g thyroid disease
  • The vet may recommend behavioural therapy, or suggest referral to veterinary behaviourist or behaviour counsellor
  • Behaviour therapy often uses a technique called ‘desensitisation’. Over time this teaches your pet that loud noises are nothing to be afraid of
  • Sometimes medication prescribed by the vet is used to help with behaviour therapy
  • Owners sometimes ask the vets to prescribe teanquilisers for their pet. Some drugs that were once popular are no longer used as they don’t reduce the fear, just the animal’s ability to respond. This can make a pet’s fear of fireworks even worse

For more information, speak to one of our team at Armac Vets. We have a number of different products that can help reduce the stress around fireworks from Thundershirts to CD’s and plug in remedies.